The Ultimate Guide To Baby Taylor Guitars

We love all Taylor guitars here at Reidys, and today we thought we’d look at the smallest guitars in Taylor’s range; the Baby Taylor.

Follow our guide to some of the most asked questions about Baby Taylor guitars as our experts answer in detail about the range.

Table of Contents

What is the Baby Taylor Guitar?

Where is the Baby Taylor made?

Is the Baby Taylor made with solid wood?

What different tonewoods does the Baby Taylor come with?

Can I plug my Baby Taylor into an amp?

What is the Baby Taylor Guitar?

Taylor brought the Baby Taylor out back in 1996 with the goal of creating a guitar that had a small body but still sounded great. Usually, because of their smaller size, small guitars are very quiet and harsh sounding, but the Baby Taylor still manages to make a full sound and balances well across a huge range.

The Baby Taylor is the smallest guitar in the Taylor range, coming in at a 3/4 size and with a slightly slimmer neck. Because it’s built and braced to a high standard, it is perfect for young beginners looking to buy a guitar that will last for many years. But it’s also ideal for seasoned veterans looking for a small and comfortable travel guitar to play out on the road or use as a quick and easy songwriting tool.

Baby Taylor BT1 inside it's included gig bag
Baby Taylor inside it’s included gig bag

Where is the Baby Taylor made?

Taylor makes the Baby range in their Tecate factory in Mexico.

Is the Baby Taylor made with solid wood?

All Taylor guitars are made with a solid wood top, and the Baby is no exception. Like all its Mexican guitars, the Baby has a layered back and sides.

Layered walnut back and sides of a Baby Taylor BT1
Beautiful back and sides of a Baby Taylor

What different tonewoods does the Baby Taylor come with?

There are three different tonewood options for Baby Taylors. The first up is the spruce top version which is the lightest in colour and the most versatile in its sound. 

Next is the mahogany top version, which will have a darker top to it, creating a more rootsy look and a slightly warmer and softer tone than its spruce cousin, which is great for singer-songwriters. 

The last tonewood is the visually striking koa top which has a very similar range to Spruce, with just a little more focus on the higher notes.

Left to right; BT2, BT1 and BTe-Koa guitars
Left to right; BT2, BT1 and BTe-Koa

Can I plug my Baby Taylor into an amp?

Taylor offers the Baby guitars as both an acoustic and an electric version that you can plug in. If the model name has an “e” after it, for example, the BT1e, it comes with a built-in pickup ready to be plugged into your amp or recording device.

Even though the Baby Taylor and the GS Mini models are smaller than the rest of the Taylor range, they have quite a few differences. Being a 3/4-sized guitar, the Baby Taylor is much smaller than the GS Mini.
The scale length, which is essentially the distance between the bridge saddle at the bottom of the guitar to the nut at the top, is 22 3/4″ on the Baby compared to 23 1/2″ on the GS Mini. This gives a bit more power and volume to the GS Mini but also could make it a little too big depending on the age or requirements of the player.

The Baby is also based on the Dreadnought body shape, which will give more of a classic guitar tone, whereas the GS Mini is a scaled-down version of the Grand Symphony, which will give a lot more of a modern acoustic guitar sound.

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